Classical Jazz '05

 

 

SOP - 63. Morgan Page Reveals the Rule of 3: Julia Michaels and

If the music or video does not play, even after a pause, try reloading your page.

 

Bookmark and Share

Bob Tozier Artist: Bob Tozier
School: North Allegheny
Notes:

3:00 - Julia Michaels - Issues

5:00 - Level of Commitment

6:40 - IV - V - iii

9:00 - Keep us guessing - Acoustic Mix

10:00 - Rule of 3 Question and Answer

13:00 - Tuned Percussion - Drones

18:00 - Layering vs. Removing

24:00 - Maroon 5

28:50 - Change and Focus

31:00 - Beatles

33:00 - Classical References

 


Comments

Ainsley Ferron from: North Allegheny - posted: October 1, 2018
The song "Sleepover" by Hayley Kiyoko utilizes a rule of 3 in the verse with the guitar, drums, and her voice. 



Chelsea Chao from: North Allegheny - posted: October 9, 2018
"We Wish You a Merry Christmas" is a classic holiday song that incorprates the rule of three in its lyrics, specifically in the chorus. The song starts off with "we wish you a Merry Christmas," then repeats twice more. Following this, the next group of three's is "oh, bring us a figgy pudding." The final trio of lyrics sings "we won't go until we get some."



Aman Khalid from: North Allegheny - posted: October 11, 2018
Beethoven's Fifth Sympony in C minor is a fantastic example of the rule of three in writing a melody line: After the dramatic introduction in the 1st movement, a pattern of three groupings of three eighth notes outlines various chords in three distinct statements, the final one being a powerful return to C minor, setting up the next three statements.



Jack Lopuszynski from: North Allegheny - posted: October 14, 2018
The Refrain of Young Blood by Five Seconds of Summer follows the rule of threes for the most part - there is the bassline outlining the chords, the vocal, and the percussion part. 



Trey Tillotson from: North Allegheny - posted: October 17, 2018
Chord progressions are neat, especially when pop songs don't just use the I, IV, V, and iv chords over and over again.  



Trey Tillotson from: North Allegheny - posted: October 17, 2018
Chord progressions are neat, especially when pop songs don't just use the I, IV, V, and iv chords over and over again.  



Aman Khalid from: North Allegheny - posted: October 17, 2018
Bach's Chaconne for solo violin is a great example of the rule of three, in that the violin takes on three voices in the form of a chord progression that outlines the melody, the occasional fourth voice manifesting as a baseline; Hilary Hahn does a fantastic job of voicing in her performance of the Chaconne.



Mary Katherine Stewart from: North Allegheny - posted: October 19, 2018
"Stay" by Alessia Cara also follows the simple rule of threes.



Nicholas Zurchin from: North Allegheny - posted: October 22, 2018
I believe that people can hear more than 3 voices at a time because otherwise how would the sound and distinction that is given from different voices be noticeable in a choir. If there is a solo and a triad in a choir, the triad can be clearly heard as well as the solo most times, that is at least my opinion.



Reid Suddaby from: North Allegheny - posted: October 22, 2018
Don't Let Me Down by the Beatles closely follows this rule of Three. It is very interesting how the beat plus Lennon and McCartney create this blend of music. 



Luke Wood from: North Allegheny - posted: October 23, 2018
The song "Battle of Evermore" by Led Zeppelin uses the rule of three because it is just vocals, acoustic guitar and mandolin.



Emma Hackworth from: North Allegheny - posted: October 25, 2018
A lot of Beatles songs use the rule of three other than "When I'm sixty-four." The song "Here, There, and Everywhere"even uses the rule of three in the title of the song. 



Brett McCutcheon from: North Allegheny - posted: October 25, 2018
Dreidle dreidle dreidle uses the rule of three with the title as the lyric.  That's the most quality song out there.



Jake Mellinger from: North Allegheny - posted: October 25, 2018
The Migos, or as I like to call them the modern day Beatles, continously use the rule of through there almost excessive use of the triplet. They have made the triplet an essential part to the hip-hop culture because of how well it sounds rapping in a melody with groups of three. On top of this there are three of them which allow for each to usually say the same line once each which allows for the magic of the rule of three to work with ease. 



Pavan Otthi from: North Allegheny - posted: October 25, 2018
What I think really brings out the pattern of 3 is the emotion. In a way, the way Julia structures this pattern, she is in a way forced by the music to bring it out. 



Malia Wilson from: North Allegheny - posted: October 26, 2018
The song Pomatter Pie from Waitress follows the rule of three in the beginning because at first it is just claps, piano, and bass. They all interact with each other in their own way and I think it's a great instrumental.



Yukang Guo from: North Allegheny - posted: October 28, 2018
In the Issue, I like the pizz of orchestral instruments in the beginning. Very different from other songs.



Kellie Smith from: North Allegheny - posted: October 29, 2018
The song "Bad" by Lennon Stella utilizes the rule of 3 at the beginning of the song with a drum pad, synth, and vocals.



Emily Vaiz from: North Allegheny - posted: October 29, 2018
Another example of a piece that incorporates the rule of three is Mozart's Symphony #40 in G minor. The piece starts off with a three-note idea and uses similar structures throughout the piece.



Lily Stromberg from: North Allegheny - posted: October 30, 2018
after listening to this podcast i started to notice more of the predicatable chord progressions in songs, it's really easy to point out IV-V-I and others like that



Lily Stromberg from: North Allegheny - posted: October 30, 2018
after listening to this podcast i started to notice more of the predicatable chord progressions in songs, it's really easy to point out IV-V-I and others like that



Ticket info - call 800-555-1212